Students work closely with one of the preceptors in the Master of Arts Program in the Social Sciences. Preceptors guide students in defining their areas of academic specialization, as well as in choosing courses. Preceptors also assist students in selecting faculty sponsors for their MA papers and take an active role in guiding and evaluating the research and writing of these papers.

Misha Appeltova

PhD Candidate, Department of History

5730 S. Woodlawn Avenue, Room 104

A historian of 20thcentury Central and Eastern Europe, Misha is currently completing her dissertation on gendered bodies in late socialist Czechoslovakia. In addition to the history of gender, sexuality and the body, Misha’s research interests include disability studies and disability history; history of everyday life; and comparative colonialism. For more information, please visit her homepage.


John Cropper

PhD Candidate, Department of History

5736 S. Woodlawn Avenue, Room 303

John’s general research interests include the history of energy, environmental change, colonialism and post-colonialism, and international development and aid in Africa. His dissertation examines the history of energy use in Senegal and investigates how the production and control of energy influenced state formation over the longue durée. For more information, please visit his homepage.


Samantha Peishan Fan

Assistant Director of MAPSS

(773) 702-2985
5736 S. Woodlawn Avenue, Room 203

Dr. Fan is the Assistant Director of MAPSS and a Lecturer in Psychology. Samantha's primary research interest examines how culture plays a pivotal role in the development of self, particularly how the experience of hearing and speaking other languages besides one’s native language might initiate an enhanced sense of understanding and acceptance of others. For more information, please visit her homepage.


Alejandro Flores

PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science

5730 S. Woodlawn Avenue, Room 403

Alex’s research agenda focuses on experiments in the study of political persuasion and attitude change, race, and identity. His dissertation investigates the effects that language choices in political communication have on political behavior, especially the political consequences of messaging in Spanish versus English among Latino voters.


Cate Fugazzola

PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology

5736 S. Woodlawn Avenue, Room 301

Cate’s doctoral work focuses on the tactical use of language in the context of social movements, and on the impact and strategic relevance of culture in the creation and diffusion of contentious discourses. Her dissertation project centers on LGBT organizing in China, and investigates the mechanism linking structure, meaning, and social change. For more information, please visit her homepage.


Kristin Gee Hickman

PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology

5730 S. Woodlawn Avenue, Room 303

Kristin’s research focuses on the relationship between language, politics, identity, and cultural production in the Middle East and North Africa. Her dissertation examines contemporary debates over colloquial Moroccan Arabic (Darija) and its expanding presence in the Moroccan public sphere.


Britta Ingebretson

PhD Candidate, Anthropology and Linguistics

5730 S. Woodlawn Avenue, Room 303

Britta's dissertation project examines the intersection of gender, language, and social class through the lens of governmental and personal projects of improvement in rural China. Her general research interests include anthropology of East Asia, gender, the state, social class, rural development, and the politics of language variation and change. For more information, visit her homepage.


Tania Islas Weinstein

PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science

5736 S. Woodlawn Avenue, Room 201

Tania’s research interests include democratic and aesthetic theory, nationalism, ideology, cultural policy, and the relationship between the state and artistic production. Her dissertation analyzes the way art is used as a tool for political representation, education, and mobilization in contemporary Mexico. For more information, please visit her homepage.


Matthew Knisley

PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology

5730 S. Woodlawn Avenue, Room 303

Matthew’s dissertation examines the co-construction of social and ecological landscapes in eastern Africa over the last 2,000 years, focusing on the transition from foraging to food production and its effects. His anthropological and archaeological research deals broadly with historical ecology, ranging from forager studies to industrialization and the Anthropocene.


Min Sok Lee

Lecturer in the Department of Economics

Saieh Hall, Room 011

Dr. Lee is a Lecturer in the Department of Economics at the University of Chicago, teaching undergraduate courses in principles of microeconomics and intermediate microeconomics. Min Lee holds a BA in economics from the University of Cambridge (UK), and a PhD in economics from the University of Chicago.


Will Levine

PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science

(773) 834-3807
5736 S. Woodlawn Avenue, Room 201

Will’s research interests are in the history of political thought, democratic theory, and critical theory. His dissertation looks at how an array of nineteenth and early twentieth-century German theorists, writers and activists took up Immanuel Kant’s political thought to theorize the role of ideals in democratic political change.


Victor O. Lima

Senior Lecturer in Economics and the College; Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies in Economics

(773) 834-6672
Saieh Hall, Room 105

Dr. Lima is a Senior Lecturer in Economics and the College; Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies in Economics.  His research interests include: monetary economics; social effects; unemployment effects of labor regulation. For more information, please visit his homepage.


Muh-Chung Lin

Earl S. Johnson Instructor in Sociology

(773) 702-6591
5730 S. Woodlawn Avenue, Room 403

Dr. Lin's research interests are family sociology, social demography, and aging and the life course, particularly intimate relationships over the life course. His doctoral research focuses on remarriage: its socio-demographic patterns, marital happiness and dyadic interactions, and its social embeddedness. For more information, please visit his homepage.


John McCallum

Earl S. Johnson Instructor in History

(773) 702-5351
5736 S. Woodlawn, Room 302

Dr. McCallum is the Earl S. Johnson Instructor in History. His broader research interests include moral sentiments and violence, total war, human rights, the United States in 20th century global history, and the history of democracy and the state. For more information, visit his homepage.


Ray Noll

PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science and Anthropology

5730 S. Woodlawn Avenue, Room 104

Ray's research is centered around therapeutic and alternative pre-trial programming at Cook County Jail in Chicago, Illinois. Her dissertation utilizes long-term ethnographic data in conversation with contemporary political and anthropological theory and attends to broader shifts in techniques of policing and punishment within contemporary imaginations of governmentality, political participation, and freedom. Ray particularly focuses on the intersection of race, gender, and sexuality within communities most impacted by carceral systems in Chicago.


Jeffrey Parker

PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology

5736 S. Woodlawn Avenue, Room 301

As an urban sociologist, Jeffrey’s research focuses on the balancing of economic interests and cultural commitments that occurs as people make meaning, identity, and community. His dissertation work focuses on how urban merchants reckon with their neighborhood’s reputations as both receivers of those reputations and active participants in their construction. For more information, please visit his homepage.