The MAPSS program is a teaching unit of the Graduate Division of the Social Sciences, whose deans and departmental chairs play an active role in supporting the mission of the program. The actual teaching faculty of the MAPSS Program encompasses the entire roster of the Division of the Social Science as well as professors and faculty from the other Divisions and professional schools. The Executive Committee comprises University faculty with a special interest in MAPSS. Committee members work with the MAPSS director in establishing program goals and procedures, as well as consulting on admissions and aid.

Mark Hansen

Faculty Director of MAPSS and the Charles L. Hutchinson Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Political Science and the College

Pick Hall, Room 316A
(773) 702-5476

Dr. Hansen is Faculty Director of MAPSS and the Charles L. Hutchinson Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Political Science and the College. He is also one of the nation's leading scholars of American politics. His research has focused on interest groups, citizen activism and public opinion. He is the author of two books, Mobilization, Participation and Democracy in America (1993) with Steven Rosenstone and Gaining Access: Congress and the Farm Lobby, 1919-1981 (1991). For more information, please visit his homepage.


Chad Cyrenne

Managing Director, MA Programs in the Social Sciences

5730 S. Woodlawn Avenue, Room 306
(773) 702-5885

Dr. Cyrenne is a Political Scientist and Managing Director of the MA Programs in the Social Sciences. He teaches courses in the history of political thought, with a particular focus on the 18th and 19th centuries, as well as seminars in contemporary political philosophy. For more information, please visit his homepage.


Ralph A. Austen

Professor Emeritus of African History

Social Sciences Research Building, Room 330
(773) 702-8397

Dr. Austen is professor emeritus of African history. His current research (and limited teaching) focuses on the political economy and cultural dimensions of European overseas expansion (including autobiographical writings by "colonial subjects") and African literature. More information can be found on his homepage.


Rachel Fulton Brown

Associate Professor of Medieval History

Harper East 686
(773) 702-4326

Dr. Brown is an Associate Professor of Medieval History and her principal research concerns the intellectual and affective making of prayer in the medieval Christian West, with special emphasis on the practices that developed from the tenth through the fifteenth centuries for prayer to the Virgin Mother of God. Foremost among these practices was the recitation of an office of the Virgin modeled on the monastic liturgy of the Hours. Her immediate purpose is to find a way to describe monastic and Marian prayer as a practical art, that is, as a practice that takes skill and uses particular tools. Her ultimate goal is to develop an understanding of the meaning and importance of the aesthetics of worship, that is, of worship as itself a creative act. More information can be found on her homepage.


Elisabeth S. Clemens

William Rainey Harper Professor of Sociology

Social Science Research Building, Room 323
(773) 834-4746

Dr. Clemens is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Chicago as well as a former Master of the Social Sciences Collegiate Division. Her research explores the role of social movements and organizational innovation in political change. More information can be found on her homepage.


Michael P. Conzen

Professor of Geography

Pick Hall, 3rd Floor
(773) 702-8301

Dr. Conzen is Professor of Geography. His research interests include include urban organization and change, resource use and management strategies, and landscape studies. He is the author of many works, including World Patterns in Modern Urban Change, Boston: A Geographical Portrait, and The Making of the American Landscape. His work with the Committee on Geographical Studies looks to investigate the organization of area, exploration of the earth environment and of its interactions with human life, and inquire into the geographical dimensions of cultures and societies. More information can be found on is homepage.


Jane Dailey

Associate Professor of American History, the Law School, and the College

Social Sciences Research Building, Room 225A
(773) 834-2582

Dr. Dailey is an associate professor in History, the College, and the Law School. The recipient of fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the American Academy in Berlin, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, Professor Dailey is currently finishing a book on race, sex, and the civil rights movement from emancipation to the present that will be published by Harcourt. She is also writing a general history of the United States since 1877 for Bedford Books. More information can be found on her homepage.


Judith B. Farquhar

Max Palevsky Professor of Anthropology Emerita and of Social Sciences in the College

Haskell Mezz 134
(773) 702-7735

Dr. Farquhar is the The Max Palevsky Professor of Anthropology Emerita and of Social Sciences in the College. She does research on traditional medicine, popular culture, and everyday life in contemporary China. Anthropological areas of interest include medical anthropology; the anthropology of knowledge and of embodiment; critical theory and cultural studies; and theories of reading, writing, and translation. More information can be found on her homepage.


Raymond D. Fogelson

Professor of Anthropology, of Human Development, and of Social Sciences in the College

Haskell 227
(773) 702-7726

Dr. Fogelson is a Professor of Anthropology, of Human Development, and of Social Sciences in the College. Professor Fogelson conducts research on the ethnology and ethnohistory of Indians of the Southeastern United States. He is concerned with issues involving Indian identity, especially with problems of tribal recognition and the repatriation/rematriation of physical remains and material culture as well as questions of mixed Indian status. More information can be found on his homepage.


Morrie Fred

Lecturer in MAPSS (Anthropology)

5730 S. Woodlawn Avenue, Room 304
(773) 834-2015

Dr. Fred is a Lecturer in MAPSS (Anthropology). Since he began teaching at the University of Chicago in 1997, he has taught seminars related to his research interests: the Anthropology of Museums, the Anthropology of Dis/ability, Israel in Film and Ethnography, Ethnographic Methods, and American Legal Culture. For more information, please visit his homepage


Susan Goldin-Meadow

Bearsdley Ruml Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Psychology and Committee on Human Development

5848 S. University Avenue, Room 204
(773) 702-2585

Dr. Goldin-Meadow is the Bearsdley Ruml Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Psychology and Committee on Human Development at the University of Chicago. She is interested in how the manual modality can serve the needs of communication and thinking led to her current work on the gestures that accompany speech in hearing individuals. She has found that gesture can convey substantive information – information that is often not expressed in the speech it accompanies. Gesture can thus reveal secrets of the mind to those who pay attention. More information can be found on her homepage.


Ramón A. Gutiérrez

Preston & Sterling Morton Distinguished Service Professor in United States History and the College

Social Sciences Research Building, Room 514
(773) 702-3286

Dr. Gutiérrez is the Preston & Sterling Morton Distinguished Service Professor in United States History and the College. Professor Gutiérrez's research interests include Chicano history, race and ethnicity in American life, Chicano/Latino studies, Indian-White relations in the Americas, social and economic history of the Southwest, colonial Latin America, and Mexican immigration. More information can be found on his homepage.


Gary Herrigel

Paul Klapper Professor in the College and in the Social Sciences Division

Pick Hall 423
(773) 702-8067

Dr. Herrigel is Paul Klapper Professor in the College and in the Division of Social Sciences and resides in the Political Science Department, but is also Associated Faculty in the Department of Sociology at the University of Chicago, a Visiting Professor in the Institute for Sociology at the Georg-August Universität in Göttingen, Germany, and a long time associate and collaborator at the SOFI Institut in Göttingen. His expertise is in comparative political economy, economic sociology, economic geography, business strategy, and business history. More information can be found on his homepage.


Alan L. Kolata

Bernard E. and Ellen C. Sunny Distinguished Service Professor of Anthropology and of Social Sciences in the College

(773) 702-7729
Haskell 116/135

Dr. Kolata is the Bernard E. and Ellen C. Sunny Distinguished Service Professor of Anthropology and of Social Sciences in the College. Professor Kolata leads ongoing interdisciplinary research projects studying human-environment interactions over the past 3000 years in the Lake Titicaca basin of Bolivia, on the north coast of Peru and most recently in Thailand and Cambodia. More information can be found on his homepage.


Martha McClintock

David Lee Shillinglaw Distinguished Service Professor in Psychology

(773) 702-2579
Institute for Mind and Biology, Room 329

Dr. McClintock is the David Lee Shillinglaw Distinguished Service Professor in Psychology. She is the Founder of the Institute for Mind and Biology, Co-Director of the Center for Interdisciplinary Health Disparities Research (CIHDR), and holds joint appointments in the Departments of Psychology and Comparative Human Development, the Committees on Neurobiology and Evolutionary Biology, and the College. Dr. McClintock has been at the University of Chicago since 1976. More information can be found on her homepage.


Omar M. McRoberts

Associate Professor of Sociology

(773) 834-8970
Social Sciences Research Building, Room 427

Dr. McRoberts is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and The College. His scholarly and teaching interests include the sociology of religion, urban sociology, urban poverty, race, and collective action. McRoberts currently is conducting a study of black religious responses to, and influences on, social welfare policy since the New Deal, culminating with George W. Bush's Office of Faith Based and Community Initiatives. He is also initiating an ethnographic project on cultures of death and dying among black congregations in low-income urban contexts. More information can be found on his homepage.


Howard Nusbaum

Professor, Department of Psychology and in the College; Committee on Computational Neuroscience; Executive Committee Member, MA in Computational Social Science Program

(773) 702-6468
Beecher Hall, 408

Dr. Nusbaum is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and in the College; Committee on Computational Neuroscience; and an Executive Committee Member for the Masters in Computational Social Science Program. Professor Nusbaum's research interests include wisdom, language use, attention, learning, memory consolidation and sleep, working memory, understanding, affect, categorization, cognitive neuropharmocology, cognitive engineering and human factors. More information can be found on his homepage.


Nathan Tarcov

Professor of Social Thought and Political Science and in the College

(773) 702-8064
Foster 316

Dr. Tarcov is a Professor of Social Thought and Political Science and in the College. Professor Tarcov's scholarly interests include history of political theory, education and family in political theory, and principles of US foreign policy. Aside from the books listed below, he has published numerous pieces on Machiavelli, Locke, the American Founding, Leo Strauss, and topics such as democracy, constitutionalism, and revolution. More information can be found on his homepage.


Richard P. Taub

Professor Emeritus in the Department of Sociology and the College

(773) 834-8907
HD 101

Dr. Taub is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Sociology and the College. Professor Taub is interested in economic development, poverty, social change, India, and Honor. His current interests include urban, rural and community economic development, the nature of entrepreneurship, public policy with particular concern about implementation and organization of policy initiatives, evaluation of social programs and the sociology of India. Taub is currently working on the way neighborhood contexts shape aspiration. More information can be found on his homepage.


Dain Borges

Former Faculty Director for MA Programs in the Social Sciences Division; Associate Professor of History, Romance Languages and Literatures

Social Sciences Research Building, Room 507
(773) 702-8317

Dr. Borges is the former Faculty Director of MAPSS and Associate Professor of History, Romance Languages and Literatures, and the College. Professor Borges is a historian of Latin America, specializing in modern Brazilian social and cultural history. He is the author of The Family in Bahia, Brazil, 1870-1945. He works on nineteenth and twentieth century Latin American culture and ideas. For more information, please visit his homepage.


John MacAloon

Professor, Social Sciences Graduate Division and in The College; Director Emeritus, MAPSS; and Associated Faculty in the Department of Anthropology

Gates Blake Hall 424
(773) 702-8468

Dr. MacAloon is Director Emeritus of MAPSS; Professor in the Social Sciences Graduate Division and The College; and Associated Faculty in the Department of Anthropology. He is an anthropologist and historian. His research focuses theoretically on cultural performance theory and substantively on the modern Olympic Movement and Olympic Games. More information can be found on his homepage.